Digital Module 17: Data Visualizations

5 (1 vote)

Recorded On: 08/20/2020

In this digital module, Nikole Gregg and Dr. Brian Leventhal discuss strategies to ensure data visualizations achieve graphical excellence. Data visualizations are commonly used by measurement professionals to communicate results to examinees, the public, educators, and other stakeholders. To create effective visualizations, it is important that they communicate data effectively, efficiently, and accurately. Unfortunately, measurement and statistical software default graphics typically fail to uphold these standards and are therefore not necessarily suitable for publication or presentation to the public. The instructors review key literature, discuss strategies for enhancing graphical presentation, and provide an introduction to the Graph Template Language (GTL) in SAS to illustrate how elementary components can be used to make efficient, effective and accurate graphics for a variety of audiences. The module contains audio-narrated slides, embedded illustrative videos, quiz questions with diagnostic feedback, a glossary, sample SAS code, and other learning resources.

Key words: data visualization, graphical excellence, graphical template language, SAS

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Digital Module
Recorded 08/20/2020
Recorded 08/20/2020 Full version of the digital module with interactive components, quizzes, glossary, and other resources.
DM17 VIDEO (Introduction, Version 1.0)
Open to view video.
Open to view video. Video version of the introduction without the instructor and designer introduction videos. [4 minutes]
DM17 VIDEO (Section 1, Version 1.0)
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Open to view video. Video version of the first content section of the module. [15 minutes]
DM17 VIDEO (Section 2, Version 1.0)
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Open to view video. Video version of the second content section of the module. [23 minutes]
DM17 VIDEO (Section 3, Version 1.0)
Open to view video.
Open to view video. Video version of the third content section of the module. [55 minutes]
Example Video 1 - Side-by-Side Histogram
Open to view video.
Open to view video. Video demonstration of how to create a side-by-side histogram in SAS using the Graphical Template Language. [13 minutes]
Example Video 2 - Item Characteristic Curve
Open to view video.
Open to view video. Example video demonstration how to create an item characteristic curve in IRT using the SAS Graphical Template Language. [15 Minutes]
Example Video 3 - Over-under Histogram
Open to view video.
Open to view video. Video example demonstrating how to create an over-under histogram using the SAS Graphical Template Language. [12 minutes]
Example Video 4 - Change Graph
Open to view video.
Open to view video. Example video demonstrating how to create a change graph using the SAS Graphical Template Language. [17 minutes]

Nikole Gregg

Doctoral Student

Nikole Gregg is a doctoral student in the Assessment & Measurement program at James Madison University, where she has taken on many roles, including various assessment and measurement consulting experiences at JMU and in K-12 settings. Through her work, she has refined and developed skills necessary to present sophisticated data analyses to non-technical audiences. Her research interests include the application of multidimensional item response theory to account for response styles, fairness in testing, and validity theory. Nikole is passionate about improving fairness and equity within assessment, measurement, and policy.

Contact Nikole via greggnl@dukes.jmu.edu

Brian Leventhal

Assistant Professor

Brian is an assistant professor in the Assessment and Measurement PhD program in the Department of Graduate Psychology at James Madison University as well as an assistant assessment specialist in the Center for Assessment and Research Studies at James Madison University. There, he teaches courses in quantitative methods, including a course on Simulation Studies in Psychometrics. Brian received his Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh. His research interests include multidimensional item response models that account for response styles, response process models, and classification errors in testing. Brian is passionate about teaching and providing professional development for graduate students and early-career practitioners. He has thoroughly enjoyed collaborating with Allison Ames and the Instructional Design Team to develop this module. 

Contact Brian via leventbc@jmu.edu